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SGOMA Remembers Spc. Robert Donevski – One Year later January 16, 2011

Posted by stgeorgeoma in Armed Forces, Armed Services, Eastern Orthodox, Memorial, Military, Networking, News, Orthodox, Religion, Religious, SGOMA News, Uncategorized.
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SGOMA Remembers Spc. Robert Donevski – One Year later

Today the Saint George Orthodox Military Association, along with the parishioners of Holy Trinity Chapel remembered, during the Divine Liturgy at Fort Bliss, the one year anniversary marking the blessed repose of Specialist Robert Donevski, of Sun City, Arizona. Specialist Donevski was killed in the line of duty in Abad, Afghanistan on January 16th, 2010. Please keep Specialist Donevski and his family in your prayer this day. Memory Eternal! Вечна меморија!

Brief Bio:
Spc. Robert Donevski, 19, died Saturday, January 16th, 2010 from wounds he suffered when insurgents attacked his unit with small-arms fire in Abad, in the Korengal Valley of Afghanistan.

He was assigned to the 2nd Battalion, 12th Infantry Regiment, 4th Brigade Combat Team, 4th Infantry Division. Robert joined the Army in July 2008 and was deployed to Afghanistan in June 2009 from Fort Carson, Colo. He is survived by his parents, Linda and Ganko, and brother, Chris. Robert died doing exactly that he wanted to do, his parents said. He wanted to be in the Army since he was 5 years old, they said, showing a picture of a young Robert saluting a flag as a boy. “He loved his country and wanted to protect it,” Linda said.

“He loved his friends,” Ganko, said. “And he loved the state of Arizona. He said it was the best state. He had been to Georgia, and Germany and came home and said this was the best place in the world.” “And he loved America, he loved his country,” he said.

Ganko, who was born in Bulgaria, told him that he had served in Vietnam, so Robert shouldn’t feel he needed to serve in the military, as well. Robert remained determined.

Robert was classified as an E-4 specialist, but recently tested to be promoted to sergeant. “He will be buried as a sergeant,” Linda said the Army told her. “And he will receive a Bronze Star for protecting his fellow soldiers in the fire fight.”

Robert’s body was returned to Arizona on military flights, escorted by members of his detachment. The Army honored Robert with several medals, including the Purple Heart.

The Funeral was held at St. George Orthodox Church in Phoenix, Arizona, and Robert was buried in the National Cemetery in Phoenix with full military honors.

Memory Eternal! Вечна меморија!

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SGOMA Remembers the 1st Anniversary of the Blessed Repose of PCF Serge Kropov, USMC December 20, 2010

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Private First Class Serge Kropov, USMC

Born: July 28, 1988 in Moscow, Russia
Killed in the line of duty: Dec. 20, 2009, in Bastion, Afghanistan
Interment: Monastery of St. Tikhon of Zadonsk Cemetery, South Canaan, PA

Brief Bio:

Private First Class Serge Kropov, of Hawley, Pa., was killed Sunday, Dec. 20, 2009, in Bastion, Afghanistan.

Born July 28, 1988, in Moscow, Russia, he was a son of Igor and Allison (Alevtina) Kropov.

He was a military career man who served in the U.S. Marine Corps. He served in the military Tour of Iraq and the military Tour of Afghanistan. Kropov was assigned to a Marine aircraft group based at Marine Corps Air Station Miramar, which is near San Diego, California.

He was preceded in death by his paternal grandparents, Sergey and Nina Kropov; and his maternal grandparents, Anna and Vladimir Patrusheva. Surviving, in addition to his parents, is his sister, Anna Kropov.

Funeral Services with full military honors were held at  the Monastery Church of St. Tikhon of Zadonsk, South Canaan, PA, with His Grace, Bishop Tikhon, officiating. Interment followed in the Monastery Cemetery.

Memorial contributions may be made to St. Tikhon’s Orthodox Monastery.

A Panikhida will be offered by the Saint George Orthodox Military Association on the 1st Anniversary – December 20, 2010

Memory Eternal!  Vichnaja Pamjat!

Happy Anniversary! SGOMA turns 1! October 20, 2010

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October 20th, 2010 – Feast Day of Saint Artemius/1st anniversary of the Saint George Orthodox Military Association (SGOMA).

One year ago today, an idea was born to find ways to support our Eastern Orthodox Christians serving in the U.S. Armed Forces.

What started out as a letter writing campaign to try to get an Orthodox Chapel on Fort Bliss, one of the largest Army Bases in the U.S., turned out to develop into a Pan-Orthodox organization of active duty & reserve military, dependents, retirees, veterans and their families, all with the same goal, to advance the cause of our Orthodox men and women serving our country at home and overseas.

In the past year…

Our Facebook page went from 2 members to over 1,360 people. Our webpage has received over 100,000 hits, with visitors from all around the globe.

With the help and generosity of Ancient Faith Radio the Association has a regular podcast series called “Orthodox Christians on the Front Lines” available for download any time at: http://www.ancient faith.com

Our Orthodox Chaplains have done an outstanding job in helping us with the Podcasts and supplying us with liturgical information, Chaplain and Chapel updates, all in order to help our Orthodox brothers and sisters in the U.S. Armed Forces.

SGOMA has sent out over 25 Orthodox Survival Packages to our Orthodox service members in Iraq and Afghanistan.

Through the great generosity of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese SGOMA has been able to send out over 40 “Orthodox New Testament & Psalms” to our service members in the USA and around the world.

As we enter into our second year, SGOMA will continue to work towards serving our Orthodox Troops and find new opportunities to reach out to them and let them know they are loved, cared about, prayed for and remembered by the members of our association throughout the year.

SGOMA is working with USFallen.org in order to more accurately recognize and honor those Eastern Orthodox Christians who have given their lives in defense of our country. We will continue to expand, honor, pray for, and remember all of our fallen Orthodox service members throughout the year, in special panikhidas, and during Divine Liturgies.

SGOMA is continuing work on developing a home catechetical program and providing resources for Orthodox Home Schooling.

We are continuing to reach out to our Orthodox Troops, their families and our Orthodox Chaplains to bring you more interesting and educational Podcasts on our Ancient Faith series “Orthodox Christians on the Front Lines.”

We are very grateful for all the wonderful people who have donated to the Saint George Orthodox Military Association over the past year. Through your generosity we have been able to do the things that we have for our troops. We are still in need of more donations to continue the work that we have begun. If you would like donate to SGOMA please feel free to contact us via email at: StGeorgeOMA@gmail.com or mail your donations to us at: SGOMA, 2521 N. Main St., Unit 1, #198, Las Cruces, NM 88001. All your donations are tax detectable.

As always, we are open to ideas and suggestions on how we can better serve our Orthodox service members, their dependents, as well as our retirees and veterans. If you have any ideas please contact us and let us know.

We are excited to continue serving our Orthodox Service Members as we enter our second year. We ask for your continued prayers for our Association, but more importantly for our Airmen, Marines, Sailors, Soldiers, and Coast Guardsmen who so proudly and vigilantly protect our country every day. Our never-ending gratitude goes out to them!

Saint George Orthodox Military Association….we are “Supporting our Eastern Orthodox Christians serving in the U.S. Armed Forces”

Orthodox Military Saints for October October 5, 2010

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Oct. 1st – The Protection of the Most-holy Theotokos

The Protection of the Most Holy Theotokos: “Today the Virgin stands in the midst of the Church, and with choirs of Saints she invisibly prays to God for us. Angels and Bishops venerate Her, Apostles and prophets rejoice together, Since for our sake she prays to the Eternal God!”

This miraculous appearance of the Mother of God occurred in the mid-tenth century in Constantinople, in the Blachernae church where her robe, veil, and part of her belt were preserved after being transferred from Palestine in the fifth century.

On Sunday, October 1, during the All Night Vigil, when the church was overflowing with those at prayer, the Fool-for-Christ St Andrew (October 2), at the fourth hour, lifted up his eyes towards the heavens and beheld our most Holy Lady Theotokos coming through the air, resplendent with heavenly light and surrounded by an assembly of the Saints. St John the Baptist and the holy Apostle John the Theologian accompanied the Queen of Heaven. On bended knees the Most Holy Virgin tearfully prayed for Christians for a long time. Then, coming near the Bishop’s Throne, she continued her prayer.

After completing her prayer she took her veil and spread it over the people praying in church, protecting them from enemies both visible and invisible. The Most Holy Lady Theotokos was resplendent with heavenly glory, and the protecting veil in her hands gleamed “more than the rays of the sun.” St Andrew gazed trembling at the miraculous vision and he asked his disciple, the blessed Epiphanius standing beside him, “Do you see, brother, the Holy Theotokos, praying for all the world?” Epiphanius answered, “I do see, holy Father, and I am in awe.”

The Ever-Blessed Mother of God implored the Lord Jesus Christ to accept the prayers of all the people calling on His Most Holy Name, and to respond speedily to her intercession, “O Heavenly King, accept all those who pray to You and call on my name for help. Do not let them not go away from my icon unheard.”

Sts Andrew and Epiphanius were worthy to see the Mother of God at prayer, and “for a long time observed the Protecting Veil spread over the people and shining with flashes of glory. As long as the Most Holy Theotokos was there, the Protecting Veil was also visible, but with her departure it also became invisible. After taking it with her, she left behind the grace of her visitation.”

At the Blachernae church, the memory of the miraculous appearance of the Mother of God was remembered. In the fourteenth century, the Russian pilgrim and clerk Alexander, saw in the church an icon of the Most Holy Theotokos praying for the world, depicting St Andrew in contemplation of her.

The Primary Chronicle of St Nestor reflects that the protective intercession of the Mother of God was needed because an attack of a large pagan Russian fleet under the leadership of Askole and Dir. The feast celebrates the divine destruction of the fleet which threatened Constantinople itself, sometime in the years 864-867 or according to the Russian historian Vasiliev, on June 18, 860. Ironically, this Feast is considered important by the Slavic Churches but not by the Greeks.

The Primary Chronicle of St Nestor also notes the miraculous deliverance followed an all-night Vigil and the dipping of the garment of the Mother of God into the waters of the sea at the Blachernae church, but does not mention Sts Andrew and Epiphanius and their vision of the Mother of God at prayer. These latter elements, and the beginnings of the celebrating of the Feast of the Protection, seem to postdate St Nestor and the Chronicle. A further historical complication might be noted under

(October 2) dating St Andrew’s death to the year 936.

The year of death might not be quite reliable, or the assertion that he survived to a ripe old age after the vision of his youth, or that his vision involved some later pagan Russian raid which met with the same fate. The suggestion that St Andrew was a Slav (or a Scythian according to other sources, such as S. V. Bulgakov) is interesting, but not necessarily accurate. The extent of Slavic expansion and repopulation into Greece is the topic of scholarly disputes.

In the PROLOGUE, a Russian book of the twelfth century, a description of the establishment of the special Feast marking this event states, “For when we heard, we realized how wondrous and merciful was the vision… and it transpired that Your holy Protection should not remain without festal celebration, O Ever-Blessed One!”

Therefore, in the festal celebration of the Protection of the Mother of God, the Russian Church sings, “With the choirs of the Angels, O Sovereign Lady, with the venerable and glorious prophets, with the First-Ranked Apostles and with the Hieromartyrs and Hierarchs, pray for us sinners, glorifying the Feast of your Protection in the Russian Land.” Moreover, it would seem that St Andrew, contemplating the miraculous vision was a Slav, was taken captive, and became the slave of the local inhabitant of Constantinople named Theognostus.

Churches in honor of the Protection of the Mother of God began to appear in Russia in the twelfth century. Widely known for its architectural merit is the temple of the Protection at Nerl, which was built in the year 1165 by holy Prince Andrew Bogoliubsky. The efforts of this holy prince also established in the Russian Church the Feast of the Protection of the Mother of God, about the year 1164.

At Novgorod in the twelfth century there was a monastery of the Protection of the Most Holy Theotokos (the so-called Zverin monastery) In Moscow also under Tsar Ivan the Terrible the cathedral of the Protection of the Mother of God was built at the church of the Holy Trinity (known as the church of St Basil the Blessed).

On the Feast of the Protection of the Most Holy Theotokos we implore the defense and assistance of the Queen of Heaven, “Remember us in your prayers, O Lady Virgin Mother of God, that we not perish by the increase of our sins. Protect us from every evil and from grievous woes, for in you do we hope, and venerating the Feast of your Protection, we magnify you.”

Oct. 2ndSt. Theodore (Ushakov) the Righteous Admiral

St Theodore, one of Russia’s greatest naval heroes of the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, was born in 1745.

The unvanquished Admiral was the terror of his country’s enemies, and the deliverer of those whom the barbarians had taken captive. He served during the Russo-Turkish War (1787 – 1791), and also fought against the French. Although he fought many naval battles in the Black Sea and in the Mediterranean, he never lost a single one, and he was never wounded.

St Theodore once visited the Greek island of Kerkyra (Corfu), where he venerated the relics of St Spyridon of Tremithus (December 12), and gave support and encouragement to the Orthodox Christians in that place.

Since his naval reforms were unpopular with his superiors, St Theodore was forced to retire in 1807 by Tsar Alexander I. Having neither wife nor children, the admiral settled in the town of Alekseevo near the Sanaxar Monastery, where he regularly attended services on Sundays and Feast Days. During Great Lent he would stay in the monastery, fasting with the monks and attending the services.

Igumen Nathaniel of Sanaxar regarded St Theodore as “a neighbor and a significant patron” of the monastery. In addition to his generous gifts to the monastery, the admiral frequently gave alms to the poor and needy. He never sought earthly glory or riches, but spent his life in serving God and his neighbor.

St Theodore died in 1817 at the age of seventy-two. After navigating the sea of life with all its storms and struggles, he entered the calm harbor of eternal rest. He was buried at Sanaxar Monastery beside the church. The monastery was returned to the Russian Orthodox Church in 1991, and St Theodore’s grave was found in 1994.

St Theodore was glorified by the Orthodox Church of Russia in 2004, and a reliquary in the shape of a naval vessel was made to enshrine his holy relics.

The holy Admiral Theodore should not be confused with his relative St Theodore (Ushakov) of Sanaxar Monastery (February 19 and April 21), a monastic saint who lived from 1719 to 1791.

St Theodore is honored as a great military leader who defended Russia just as St Alexander Nevsky (November 23) and St Demetrius of the Don (May 19) did before him. One of the Russian Navy’s atomic cruisers has been named for him, and a movie has been made about his life and career. The composer Khachaturian has also written a musical piece called “Admiral Ushakov.”

Oct. 16th – The Holy Martyr Longinus the Centurion

The Holy Martyr Longinus the Centurion, a Roman soldier, served in Judea under the command of the Governor, Pontius Pilate. When our Savior Jesus Christ was crucified, it was the detachment of soldiers under the command of Longinus which stood watch on Golgotha, at the very foot of the holy Cross. Longinus and his soldiers were eyewitnesses of the final moments of the earthly life of the Lord, and of the great and awesome portents that appeared at His death. These events shook the centurion’s soul. Longinus believed in Christ and confessed before everyone, “Truly this was the Son of God” (Mt. 27:54).

According to Church Tradition, Longinus was the soldier who pierced the side of the Crucified Savior with a spear, and received healing from an eye affliction when blood and water poured forth from the wound.

After the Crucifixion and Burial of the Savior, Longinus stood watch with his company at the Sepulchre of the Lord. These soldiers were present at the All-Radiant Resurrection of Christ. The Jews bribed them to lie and say that His disciples had stolen away the Body of Christ, but Longinus and two of his comrades refused to be seduced by the Jewish gold. They also refused to remain silent about the miracle of the Resurrection.

Having come to believe in the Savior, the soldiers received Baptism from the apostles and decided to leave military service. St Longinus left Judea to preach about Jesus Christ the Son of God in his native land (Cappadocia), and his two comrades followed him.

The fiery words of those who had actually participated in the great events in Judea swayed the hearts and minds of the Cappadocians; Christianity began quickly to spread throughout the city and the surrounding villages. When they learned of this, the Jewish elders persuaded Pilate to send a company of soldiers to Cappadocia to kill Longinus and his comrades. When the soldiers arrived at Longinus’s village, the former centurion himself came out to meet the soldiers and took them to his home. After a meal, the soldiers revealed the purpose of their visit, not knowing that the master of the house was the very man whom they were seeking. Then Longinus and his friends identified themselves and told the startled soldiers to carry out their duty.

The soldiers wanted to let the saints go and advised them to flee, but they refused to do this, showing their firm intention to suffer for Christ. The holy martyrs were beheaded, and their bodies were buried at the place where the saints were martyred. The head of St Longinus, however, was sent to Pilate.

Pilate gave orders to cast the martyr’s head on a trash-heap outside the city walls. After a while a certain blind widow from Cappadocia arrived in Jerusalem with her son to pray at the holy places, and to ask that her sight be restored. After becoming blind, she had sought the help of physicians to cure her, but all their efforts were in vain.

The woman’s son became ill shortly after reaching Jerusalem, and he died a few days later. The widow grieved for the loss of her son, who had served as her guide.

St Longinus appeared to her in a dream and comforted her. He told her that she would see her son in heavenly glory, and also receive her sight. He told her to go outside the city walls and there she would find his head in a great pile of refuse. Guides led the blind woman to the rubbish heap, and she began to dig with her hands. As soon as she touched the martyr’s head, the woman received her sight, and she glorified God and St Longinus.

Taking up the head, she brought it to the place she was staying and washed it. The next night, St Longinus appeared to her again, this time with her son. They were surrounded by a bright light, and St Longinus said, Woman, behold the son for whom you grieve. See what glory and honor are his now, and be consoled. God has numbered him with those in His heavenly Kingdom. Now take my head and your son’s body, and bury them in the same casket. Do not weep for your son, for he will rejoice forever in great glory and happiness.”

The woman carried out the saint’s instructions and returned to her home in Cappadocia. There she buried her son and the head of St Longinus. Once, she had been overcome by grief for her son, but her weeping was transformed into joy when she saw him with St Longinus. She had sought healing for her eyes, and also received healing of her soul.

Oct. 20th – Holy Great Martyr Artemius  (Feast day of the Founding of the Saint George Orthodox Military Association)

Holy Great Martyr Artemius of Antioch was a prominent military leader during the reigns of the emperor Constantine the Great (May 21), and his son and successor Constantius (337-361). Artemius received many awards for distinguished service and courage. He was appointed viceroy of Egypt. In this official position he did much for the spreading and strengthening Christianity in Egypt.

St Artemius was sent by the emperor Constantius to bring the relics of the holy Apostle Andrew from Patras, and the relics of the holy Apostle Luke from Thebes of Boeotia, to Constantinople. The holy relics were placed in the Church of the Holy Apostles beneath the table of oblation. The emperor rewarded him by making him ruler of Egypt.

The emperor Constantius was succeeded on the throne by Julian the Apostate (361-363). Julian in his desire to restore paganism was extremely antagonistic towards Christians, sending hundreds to their death. At Antioch he ordered the torture of two bishops unwilling to forsake the Christian Faith.

During this time, St Artemius arrived in Antioch and publicly denounced Julian for his impiety. The enraged Julian subjected the saint to terrible tortures and threw the Great Martyr Artemius into prison. While Artemius was praying, Christ, surrounded by angels, appeared to him and said, “Take courage, Artemius! I am with you and will preserve you from every hurt which is inflicted upon you, and I already have prepared your crown of glory. Since you have confessed Me before the people on earth, so shall I confess you before My Heavenly Father. Therefore, take courage and rejoice, you shall be with Me in My Kingdom.” Hearing this, Artemius rejoiced and offered up glory and thanksgiving to Him.

On the following day, Julian demanded that St Artemius honor the pagan gods. Meeting with steadfast refusal, the emperor resorted to further tortures. The saint endured all without a single moan. The saint told Julian that he would be justly recompensed for his persecution of Christians. Julian became furious and resorted to even more savage tortures, but they did not break the will of the saint. Finally the Great Martyr Artemius was beheaded.

His relics were buried by Christians. After the death of St Artemius, his prophecy about Julian the Apostate’s impending death came true.

Julian left Antioch for a war with the Persians. Near the Persian city of Ctesiphon, Julian came upon an elderly Persian, who agreed to betray his countrymen and guide Julian’s army. The old man deceived Julian and led his army into the Karmanite wilderness, where there was neither food nor water. Tired from hunger and thirst, Julian’s army battled against fresh Persian forces.

Divine retribution caught up with Julian the Apostate. During the battle he was mortally wounded by an unseen hand and an unseen weapon. Julian groaned deeply said, “You have conquered, Galilean!” After the death of the apostate emperor, the relics of the Great Martyr Artemius were transferred with honor from Antioch to Constantinople.

St Artemius is invoked by those suffering from hernias.

Russia’s Orthodox Church priests to appear in Russian Army and Navy September 19, 2010

Posted by stgeorgeoma in Armed Forces, Armed Services, Eastern Orthodox, Military, News, Orthodox, Religion, Religious, SGOMA News.
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An interesting short news blurb about our Orthodox Brothers in the Russian Military:

From: PETROPAVLOVSK-KAMCHATSKI, September 19 (RIA Novosti)

Russia’s Orthodox Church priests will soon appear in the Russian army and navy to serve as military chaplains as Russian servicemen especially need spiritual support, Patriarch Kirill of Moscow and All Russia said on Sunday.

“By decision of the Russian president, the institution of military clergy is beginning to develop in Russia. So far we are making the first steps… But since a legal foundation has been laid, I hope that priests will soon appear in the army and the navy,” Patriarch Kirill said.

The patriarch met on Sunday with the personnel of the 16th squadron of Pacific Fleet submarines in Kamchatka in the Russian Far East.

According to the patriarch, servicemen need spiritual support.

“This is because risks linked with military service are so great that they cannot be compensated by any material benefits,” he said.

According to the Russian defense ministry, two thirds of the country’s servicemen consider themselves religious. Some 83% of them are Orthodox Christians, about 8% are Muslims, and 9% represent other confessions.

Remembering our Fallen Orthodox Military August 27, 2010

Posted by stgeorgeoma in Armed Forces, Armed Services, Eastern Orthodox, Memorial, Military, Networking, News, Orthodox, Religion, Religious, Saints, SGOMA News, Uncategorized.
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There is an Ancient custom of a Panikhida after the Liturgy on the Feast of the Beheading of St. John the Baptist for all Orthodox warriors who have laid down their lives on the field of battle. Priests and Chaplains please offer a Panikhida after this Sundays Divine Liturgy for our fallen Orthodox Service Members. Laity, please encourage your Priest to offer a Panikhida for our Fallen Troops this Sunday.

SGOMA has an incomplete listing of known Orthodox Service Members who have died while serving our Country. Please remember these brave men and women in your prayers and offer a Panikhida for them.

If you know of a Orthodox Service Member who has died serving their country, and they are not listed on the SGOMA Memorial page, then please email us with as much information on them as you have. We will gladly add them to our Memorial Page and remember them in memorials and Panikhidas throughout the year. You can email SGOMA the information at:  StGeorgeOMA@gmail.com

You can also view the Saint George Orthodox Military Association’s Memorial webpage at: http://www.orthodoxmilitary.org/Memorial_Page.html

We Remember PFC Serge Kropov July 30, 2010

Posted by stgeorgeoma in Armed Forces, Armed Services, Eastern Orthodox, Memorial, Military, Networking, News, Orthodox, Religion, Religious, Saints, SGOMA News, Uncategorized.
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We remember! On July 28th of this year SGOMA remembered one of our fallen Marines. July 28th is the birthday of PFC. Serge Kropov, USMC. Serge died in Afghanistan, in December 2009, while proudly serving his country. On this day members of SGOMA kept Serge in their prayers, as friends and family gathered around Serge’s grave at  St. Tikhon of Zadonsk Orthodox Monastery in South Canaan, PA, and held a Panachida for him.

Serge’s Mother has started a Facebook Memorial page for Serge. It is very touching and gives you a whole new feeling for the loss the Kropov family is feeling. This brings home the same loss that so many families around the United States feel who have lost a loved one serving our Country. You can view Serge’s Memorial Facebook page at:

 http://www.facebook.com/pages/manage/?act=50599020#!/group.php?gid=217355966323&ref=ts

We here at SGOMA remember Serge every day, just as we do for all of our fallen Orthodox Soldiers, Sailors, Marines, Airmen and Coast Guardsmen.  Memory Eternal!

Former U.S.N. Chaplain reposes in the Lord July 27, 2010

Posted by stgeorgeoma in Armed Forces, Armed Services, Eastern Orthodox, Memorial, Military, Networking, News, Orthodox, Religion, Religious, SGOMA News, Uncategorized.
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Former U.S.N. Chaplain, the Very Rev. Fr. Matthew B. MacKay fell asleep in the Lord on July 26, 2010, in Houston, TX. Fr. Mathew served as a Chaplain at/on: Naval Military Chaplain, Norfolk, VA. USS John F. Kennedy, 1992-1993; Iwakuni, Japan. USMC Air Base Chapel, 1989-1992.

Fr. Mathew also served in the USMC, at Camp Pendleton, CA.  as a 1st Lt., in the Artillery, 1979-1983

Fr. Mathew was also a Graduate of the Citadel (The Military College of South Carolina).

Please keep his family and friends in your prayers. You can find out more information about Fr. Mathew by going to his parishes web-page Click Here

SGOMA will post more information as it becomes available.

Memory Eternal!

SGOMA holds Memorial Day Prayer Service May 31, 2010

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The Saint George Orthodox Military Association’s Borderland Chapter (El Paso/Las Cruces held  their First Annual Memorial Day Prayer Service at Ft. Bliss National Cemetery in El Paso, Texas, on Monday May 31st, 2010 (Memorial Day) at 10:00hrs, at the Cemetery’s East Pavilion.

Hieromonk Joshua led the prayer service as all gathered to remember in prayer all of our deceased Orthodox Military Men and Women, especially those Orthodox Military Personnel (that we know of) who have fallen asleep in the Lord since last Memorial Day (2009):

CPL Nicholas G. Xiarhos – USMC – KIA Afghanistan 7/23/2009

PFC Serge Kropov – USMC – KIA  Afghanistan 12/20/2009

SPC Robert Donevski – US Army – KIA  Afghanistan 1/16/2010

CMDR William Green – US Navy – Died on Active Duty – Stuttgart, Germany 1/26/2010

PFC Winston James Miroy – US Army – Killed on Active Duty – Ft. Carson, Colorado 3/17/2010

May their Memories be Eternal!


If you know or hear of the repose of any of our Orthodox Military Members please email us and let us know so we can add their name to our prayer list so they can be remember throughout the year during Liturgies and SGOMA events and prayer services. You can email us that information anytime at:  StGeorgeOMA@gmail.com

We would like to thank all those who came out the Ft. Bliss National Cemetery on such a warm May morning. We know some may have attempted to make it out to the Ft. Bliss Cemetery today, only to get lost, turned around, or were unable to find their way through the tremendous road construction. Unfortunately neither the Cemetery nor the State Highway Department had any signage out to route people through the constructions area and to the Cemetery. We are hoping that by next Memorial Day all the road construction will be done and signage will be up directing people to the cemetery. Again, if you attempted to attend but couldn’t figure out how to get there we apologize for the inconvenience and we thank you for taking the time to honor our fallen Troops. A small group of Orthodox were able to make it through the construction and a very nice and solemn Memorial Service was held. We hope to see everyone out there next year!

A few additional photos of the Memorial Day Service can be seen on our Facebook Fan Page at: http://www.facebook.com/pages/Las-Cruces-NM/St-Georges-Orthodox-Military-Association/345507690005?v=info#!/album.php?aid=424421&id=345507690005&ref=mf

SGOMA to hold Memorial Day Prayer Service May 18, 2010

Posted by stgeorgeoma in Armed Forces, Armed Services, Eastern Orthodox, Memorial, Military, Networking, News, Orthodox, Religion, Religious, SGOMA News, Uncategorized.
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The Saint George Orthodox Military Association’s Borderland Chapter (El Paso/Las Cruces) will be holding their First Annual Memorial Day Prayer Service at Ft. Bliss National Cemetery in El Paso, Texas, on Monday May 31st, 2010 (Memorial Day) at 10:00hrs, at the Cemetery’s East Pavilion.

We will remember in prayer all of our deceased Orthodox Military Men and Women, especially those Orthodox Military Personnel who have fallen asleep in the Lord over the past year.

Everyone is welcome to attend. Please come dressed appropriately for this solemn service. Military Members are asked to come in the appropriate uniform of the day as established by their Branch of Service. For directions or information about the Fort Bliss National Cemetery please view their website at: http://www.cem.va.gov/cems/nchp/ftbliss.asp

If you have any questions about the service you can contact Subdeacon Vladimir Laven via email at: StGeorgeOMA@gmail.com

For those of you unable to attend this memorial service or any other memorial service on Memorial Day, please keep the sacrifice made by our Orthodox Sailors, Marines, Soldiers, Airmen, and Coast Guardsmen over the years in your prayers on this solemn day. Also, please keep our troops currently serving our Country in your prayers, that they may stay safe, healthy, and return home to their loved ones unharmed.